Frida Krohn

In conversation with A. Burns & J. Lundh

i samtal med A. Burns & J. Lundh
FridaKrohn

Pappersarbete/ Paperwork | Paper collage | 2012

Aileen Burns & Johan Lundh
Firstly, what was it that attracted you to art? Where does your desire to be an artist come from?

Frida Krohn
I am one of those people who were good at drawing and painting in school, not exceptionally good, but good enough to have received encouragement. I think a lot about whether I really want to be an artist. I doubt myself and change my mind about ten times a day. Despite all my doubts, I have continued to study for nearly eight years now. At this stage I have probably accepted that doubt is and always will be a part of being an artist. This may seem a little silly or clichéd. For a long time I’ve thought that all this doubt and hesitation about my choice of profession might mean that I don’t want it enough and therefore shouldn’t become an artist. But I think that this comes from an old-fashioned view of the artist’s role, that it should be a calling that one has to follow. I don’t think it’s like that, at least not in my case. How one will, should, and are expected to act as an artist interests me a great deal and I think about it all the time. When I feel a bit down, I tend to think that what I do and who I am doesn’t fit at all with the role of the artist. But most days I think, well why shouldn’t I fit in? Of course I fit! Then of course it’s also a lot of fun to work with art, to make exhibitions and talk with others about what you’re doing and find interesting.

AB & JL
The next question just as deceptively simple: what is it that you find so fascinating with paper?

FK
Paper fascinates me because it is a relatively simple material that is at the same time very complex, depending on how you look at it. One can look at the paper industry and see in it the big societal structures of the past and of contemporary times. I am also very impressed with the large quantities of paper that are produced in Sweden: there is so much talk of how we are a knowledge based society/economy in Sweden but there is still this large scale production of physical materials like paper. Paper is so ordinary, its there around us all the time; we blow our noses, pour a glass of juice, write a list, make a drawing. Books are vessels of knowledge, but the paper itself is also very physical. We’ve simply stopped thinking about paper, because it easily leads us further into other thoughts.

AB & JL
Why did you start cutting patterns in the paper? Why did you begin copying the cut-up papers?

FK
Yes, why? I think it’s about some idea of nearness, of using that which is close at hand. Those patterns and forms that I’ve cut and folded are familiar to many people, they can be found on kindergarten windows, on gift wrapped packages, and as decorative flowers. I’ve been making these copies for quite a while now and it’s probably a way of getting away from, and then returning to painting and drawing. I felt somehow limited by the materiality of painting, the colours that have to be mixed to achieve different shades and tones. It’s easy to get stuck with just mixing the paints and in the end you’ve spent ten years just mixing different shades of grey. There’s nothing wrong with that, but I want something else. The copying is very quick and quite magical. I don’t know exactly how it will turn out, so there’s an element of surprise there that is very exciting. I happen to think that it turns out looking good as well. That might seem banal, but it’s important to me.

AB & JL
When we discuss your artistic practice, we inevitably end up in discussions about your job at the post office and the history of the Swedish labour movement. Do you see a connection between your artistic work and your engagement with social issues?

FK
I don’t really know how to answer that question as I think its difficult, partially because there are many things that make me angry all the time, both in the so called art world, and in the other. And I don’t really know how to handle it. In one sense, that’s what’s driving me; that I’m really angry all the time but look kind and happy and have difficulty expressing my anger. Then on the other hand, I think that there’s a lot of talk about politics in art contexts and sometimes it feels like there’s a lot of talk and no action. So then I think that the most radical position that I can take as an artist is to join a political party or labour union in association with my other job as a postal worker. Simply, the two have nothing to do with each other but are nevertheless connected. And so you end up sitting there, shouting and mouthing off about politics anyway. It’s fun of course, but perhaps not incredibly relevant to the art I make. But now I’m changing my mind altogether and am saying that of course I can see connections between my artistic work and my political opinions. Yes, they do exist.

AB & JL
You’re right. Art is, as a rule, a terrible tool for realpolitik. But that doesn’t mean that art cannot have or shouldn’t have a role in the creation of the political. We feel that your ambivalence about art and politics is an important part of your artistic practice, so please tell us more about the connections you see.

FK
Well that’s true; art can have a role to play in the creation of the political. I just tend to get tired of how everything takes such a long time. My ambivalence towards art and politics is connected to my ambivalence about my chosen profession as an artist. In many ways, it is a profession surrounded by myths and preconceptions about how one should work. This is also the case with many other professions. I think of my doubts about my chosen profession as a defined position; that I’m choosing to talk about it. Sometimes you can get the idea that if you believe in yourself enough, inevitably other people will believe in you as well. Sometimes you hear things like “if even you don’t believe in yourself, then who else is going to do it?” That’s something I want to focus on, as I think it’s a pretty stupid thing to say. I think it should be okay to say: of course I have my doubts, but I’m going to try anyway. Maybe it is the case that I can see politics in my artistic work, but more in terms of my attitude to my work and to my colleagues. And I’m also interested in paper because of how you can trace geographical and political histories which I think is exciting, and how you can see connections to contemporary times. In my paper cutting, there is an element of craft that I view in political terms. Certain aesthetic expressions are awarded a different status depending on where they are made and by whom. I myself have difficulties in motivating why I should spend hours on end folding paper, yet I still do it.

Aileen Burns & Johan Lundh
Först, vad var det som lockade dig med konsten? Varifrån kommer önskan att bli konstnär?

Frida Krohn
Jag är en av dem som var bra på att rita och måla, inte exceptionellt bra men ändå så att jag fick uppmuntran i skolan. Jag tänker mycket på om jag verkligen vill bli konstnär, tvivlar och ändrar mig ungefär tio gånger om dagen. Trots allt tvivel har jag ju fortsatt studera i snart åtta år. Nu har jag nog accepterat att tvivlet är och kommer vara en del av att vara konstnär. Det verkar kanske lite löjligt och klyschigt. Under en lång tid har jag tänkt att om jag tvivlar och tvekar inför yrkesvalet så vill jag inte mycket nog och bör alltså inte bli konstnär men det tänker jag kommer från en gammal syn på konstnärsrollen att det ska vara som ett kall som man måste följa. Så tror jag inte att det är, i alla fall inte för mig. Hur man ska, bör och förväntas vara som konstnär intresserar mig mycket och är något som jag tänker på hela tiden. När man känner sig lite eländig tänker jag ju så klart att hur jag gör och är inte passar in alls i rollen som konstnär men de flesta andra dagar tänker jag att varför skulle jag inte passa in, så klart att jag gör! Sen är det så klart roligt att jobba med konst, göra utställningar och prata med andra om vad man gör och är intresserad av.

AB & JL
Nästa fråga är lika bedrägligt enkel: vad är det som fascinerar dig med papper?

FK
Det som fascinerar mig med papper är nog att det är ett förhållandevis enkelt material som samtidigt är väldigt komplext, lite beroende på hur man ser på det. Man kan titta på pappersindustrin och se stora samhällsstrukturer bakåt i tiden och här i vår tid. Jag är också hemskt imponerad av den mängd papper som produceras i Sverige och det har att göra med att det pratas mycket om att vi producerar kunskap i Sverige men samtidigt finns en stor produktion av fysiskt material som till exempel papper. Pappret är så vardagligt, det finns där hela tiden, vi snyter oss, häller upp ett glas jos, skriver en lista, ritar en teckning, Böcker bär kunskap men pappret är också så fysiskt. Helt enkelt har jag svårt att sluta tänka på papper, för det leder så lätt vidare till andra tankar.

AB & JL
Varför började du klippa mönster i pappret? Varför började du kopiera de klippta papprena?

FK
Ja, varför? Jag tror att det handlar om en närhet, att använda det som finns till hands. De mönster och former som jag klippt och vikt är bekanta för många, de finns på förskolefönster, på inslagna paket och som dekorativa blommor. Kopierandet har jag hållit på med under en längre tid och det är nog en väg bort från och sedan tillbaka till målning och teckning. Jag kände mig på något sätt begränsad av måleriets material, av färgen som ska blandas till olika nyanser, det är lätt att fastna och bara blanda färg och tillslut har man ägnat tio år att blanda olika grå nyanser. Det kan man ju absolut göra men jag vill ha något annat. Kopierandet är väldigt snabbt och lite magiskt. Jag vet inte exakt hur det ska bli så där finns ett överraskningsmoment som är spännande. Sen tycker jag att det blir fint, det är kanske banalt men viktigt för mig.

AB & JL
När vi diskuterar din konstnärliga praktik verkar vi förr eller senare alltid hamna i diskussioner rörande ditt arbete på Posten eller den svenska arbetarrörelsen. Ser du kopplingar mellan ditt konstnärliga arbete och ditt samhälleliga engagemang?

FK
Jag vet inte riktigt vad jag ska svara på den här frågan för jag tycker att det är svårt, dels för att jag blir förbannad på en massa saker hela tiden, både i den så kallade konstvärlden och i den andra. Och vet inte riktigt hur jag ska hantera det. På ett sätt är det väl det som driver mig, att jag är skitarg hela tiden men ser snäll ut och har svårt att kommunicera det. Men sen kan jag tänka att det är mycket prat i konstsammanhang om politik och ibland känns det väl som att det är mycket töl och lite hockey, som betyder mycket snack och liten verkstad. Så då tänker jag att det mest radikala man kan göra som konstnär är att gå med i ett politiskt parti eller fackföreningen på mitt andra jobb som brevbärare. Helt enkelt att det inte har med varandra att göra men sen hänger ju allt ihop ändå. Så sitter man där och skriker och gapar om politik ändå. Vilket i och för sig är roligt men kanske inte superrelevant för det konst jag gör. Nu ändrar jag mig helt och säger att jag visst ser kopplingar mellan mitt konstnärliga arbete och mina politiska åsikter. Ja de finns så klart.

AB & JL
Du har rätt, konst är i regel ett uselt realpolitisk verktyg. Fast det betyder givetvis inte att konsten inte kan eller ska ha en roll i skapandet av det politiska. Vi upplever att din ambivalens kring konst och politik är en viktig del av ditt konstnärskap så berätta gärna mera om de kopplingar du ser.

FK
Jo men så är det ju, att konsten kan spela roll i skapandet av något politiskt. Det är väl bara att jag ibland tröttnar för att allt tar så lång tid. Min ambivalens inför det här med konst och politik tror jag handlar om min ambivalens inför yrkesrollen som konstnär. Det är på många sätt ett yrke som är fyllt med mycket myter och föreställningar av hur man ska arbeta. Men det finns så klart inom andra yrken också. Jag tänker mycket på mitt eget tvivel inför yrket som ett förhållningssätt, att jag väljer att prata om det. Ibland kan man få uppfattningen om man bara tror tillräckligt mycket på sig själv så kommer andra också att göra det. Ibland sägs också saker som “om inte ens du tror på dig själv vem ska då göra det.” Det där är något som jag vill peta på för jag tycker att det är ganska dumt, jag tycker att det ska vara helt ok att säga, jag tvivlar men jag försöker ändå. Det är kanske är så jag kan se politiken i mitt konstnärliga arbete. Mer som en fråga om attityd till sitt yrke och sina kollegor. Sen intresserar jag mig för papper till exempel för där finns en geografisk och politisk historia som jag tycker är spännande och där man kan se kopplingar till idag. I mitt pappersklippande finns också en aspekt av pyssel som jag tycker är politisk, hur vissa estetiska uttryck beroende på var och vem som gör det får olika status. Och hur jag själv har svårt att motivera meningen med att ägna flera timmar åt att vika papper men ändå gör det.

Biography

Frida Krohn is an artist based in Stockholm. She received her Master’s of Fine Arts Degree from Umeå Academy of Fine Arts in June 2012. With Ylva Trapp, Frida manages Konsthall 323, a mobile art gallery that is located in a Mazda 323.

Frida Krohn är konstnär, bor och arbetar i Stockholm. Hon tar sin MFA på Konsthögskolan i Umeå 2012. Frida driver tillsammans med Ylva Trapp Konsthall 323, en mobil konsthall som inrymms i en Mazda 323.